Georgia O’keeffe Floral Framed Art

Georgia O'keeffe Floral Framed ArtGeorgia O’keeffe was one of the most important woman painters of the 20th Century. Her work has made an impact on artists and the art world at large, which will not likely ever be forgotten.

She was surrounded by a group of successful male painters of the earlier part of the 20th century, but chose not to emulate them. She said that there were alot of people who could do that better than she could, so she chose to paint in her own way.

She painted what was close to her in her surroundings. Whether she was at her home in New York City, or at Abique, New Mexico, O’keefe painted her world with an intimacy which to many was sensual, elegant and poetic.

O’keeffe shunned interpretation of her work. Her series of huge flowers were sometimes described as “sexual”. She was quick to deny such claims, “That is how you see them, not me!”

Georgia Okeeffe painted 200 huge flower paintings from 1918 to 1932. Roses, petunias, poppies, camellias, sunflowers, bleeding hearts, daffodils, black irises and orchids are painted at a large scale, becoming worlds of their own which capture the eye and soul of the viewer, drawing them deeply into
the composition.

Her colors are rich, and her style is completely her own hand, neither attempting to create realism, nor a stylized characature. The essence of O’keeffe’s vision and intimate experience of a flower is palpable, however, not easily described.

She said, “A flower is relatively small. Everyone has many associations with a flower – the idea of flowers. [ … ] Still – in a way – nobody sees a flower – really – it is so small – we haven’t time – and to see takes time, like to have a friend takes time. [ … ] So I said to myself – I’ll paint what I see – what the flower is to me but I’ll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking time to look at it – I will make even busy New Yorkers take time to see what I see of flowers.”

An excellent source for Georgia O’keeffe’s floral framed art is FramedArtDecor.com.

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